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Page 4 of 14
Berkeley

Shamanizing for the Culture: A new healing modality
Presented by: Meredith Sabini and Richard Russo
October 5, 2014 - 1-5pm
CE Credit: 4 hours
Fee: $95.00

SHAMANIZING FOR THE CULTURE:

A NEW HEALING MODALITY

Sunday Oct 5 1–5pm Public $60 Therapists $95 (4 CEs)

Shamanism is a cultural practice present throughout history that draws on dreams and visions. This program begins with an account of the sophisticated dream practices of the Iroquois and the Achuar of Equador, which have both been compared with modern psychotherapy. Indigenous societies also may have had culture shamans who received guidance for their people as a whole. This will be illustrated by contemporary examples of Oglala Sioux Black Elk and C. G. Jung, each of whom had sweeping visionary dreams about impending large-scale disasters; and the examples of Harriet Tubman and Taoist rainmaker Kiao-chou, who enacted effective rituals for societies in distress. Activated at times of social upheaval, the shamanic archetype may also bring dreams and visions to those not functioning as healers. Examples of “big dreams” from people today will be recounted, along with guidelines for distinguishing big or collective dreams from ordinary personal ones.

This program will also cover “Deep Dreaming,” a method developed at The Dream Institute based on field and emergence theories. In it, ordinary single dreams told during light trance are woven together to form a fresh narrative, which is then explored as if it were a dream for the culture. Themes that have appeared over the years will be mentioned and a sequence of four dreams about homelessness presented. The healing effects that this mode of sharing dreams can have will be discussed. This program demonstrates that the dreaming mind gives us access to the psyche of the culture so we have ways of influencing its suffering and benefitting from its vitality.

Course outline:

Hour 1. The shamanic archetype: what it is and how it functions

Examples of shamanic cultures: Iroquois and Achuar and their dream practices; ethnopsych. studies

Hour 2. The culture shaman and his/her role in cultural life

Two examples of culture shamans who had sweeping visionary dreams: Black Elk, C. G. Jung; accounts of their experiences

Two examples of culture shamans who enacted ritual interventions for their people: Harriet Tubman, Kiao-chou rainmaker

Psychosocial question: How is the shaman’s information expressed to and integrated by their people?

Hour 3. Visionary dreams of contemporary individuals: how to recognize them and help them hold collective material

The isolation of visionaries in modern society

Examples of contemporary visionary dreams from instructors’ collection

Hour 4. Deep Dreaming: a modern method in which “big dreams” can be heard; and where a dream for the culture is co-created using individual dreams told in group session

Examples of themes from Deep Dreaming sessions; presentation of one sequence of dreams about homelessness

Discussion of how a sequence like this affects the dreamers, when shared, affects others, and has ripple effect into the culture a large; homelessness is a shared problem all can relate rather than isolated issue for a few

Learning goals:

Those attending will be able to:

1. Explain the difference between ordinary individual dreams and “big” or collective dreams that come to an individual but refer to the social body as a whole

2. Compare mental health practices of dreaming cultures with ours today

3. Utilize the concept of the “big dream” when listening to client material

4. Discuss the value big dreams can have for healing societal suffering

5. Critique the lack of venues for sharing dreams in our society today

Presenters:

Richard Russo, MA, an artist, author, and dream educator for over 30 years,

is past president of the IASD and Associate Director at The Dream Institute.

Meredith Sabini, PhD, psychologist and founder-director of The Dream Institute,

has a longstanding interest in cross-cultural healing modalities.

Registration: To reserve a place for either program, call or email; you may pay at the door.

THE DREAM INSTITUTE OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA

1672 University Ave. Berkeley, CA 94703 510-845-1767

www.dream-institute.org dreaminstituteca@gmail.com


1672 University Ave.
(Posted 09/09/2014)
Santa Rosa

Dream Dialogues
Presented by: Meredith Sabini
October 25, 2014 - 10am-1pm
CE Credit: 3 hours
Fee: $75.00

SANTA ROSA DREAM SEMINARS

for psychotherapists

DREAM DIALOGUES

Saturday Oct 25 10am-1pm $75 3 CEs

It isn’t necessary to understand a dream’s symbolism in order to initiate a dialogue with a client; your curiosity, observational skills, and thoughtful reflections are more than adequate tools. Three stages of dreamwork will be demonstrated: 1) Listening to sample dreams the way we might listen to poetry or jazz; re-telling the dream to witness its evocative potential. 2) Doing a “dream inquiry” to clarify the scenery, figures, actions, and to elicit further details. 3) Entering “dream space,” akin to transitional or play space, where dream themes can be mutually explored for their fantasy and reality components. This experiential approach to dreamwork sets aside clinical and theoretical formulations so that the specifics of a dream can lead the way for meanings to emerge.

Course outline

Hour 1. The naturalistic approach to dreams: listening as if dreams were poetry or jazz;

affective, somatic, cognitive, and imagistic ways of perceiving and responding to dreams

Hour 2. Doing a dream inquiry and creating dream space to engage client in the various facets of a dream, with samples provided or brought in

Hour 3. Engaging with dream narratives by identifying the central affect, core metaphor, figures, dynamic tension, dreamer’s stance, dramatic narrative.

Learning goals

Those attending will be able to:

1. Explain the inductive potential of re-telling a dream to a client and clarifying the manifest content

2. Use Winnicott’s notion of transitional/play space and apply it to engaging clients with their dreams

3. List four basic modes by which a dream can be engaged (affectively, somatically, imagistically, cognitively).

Instructor: Meredith Sabini, PhD, is director of The Dream Institute and a licensed psychologist (PU7397) in the field since 1972 who now specializes in dream training, research, and consultation.

Registration: To reserve a place, call 510-845-1767 or email dreaminstituteca@gmail.com

and give your name, license, and course choices. You may pay at the door.

Location: Instructor’s home-office near Montgomery Village; map sent upon registration.

THE DREAM INSTITUTE OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA

1672 University Ave. Berkeley, CA 94703 510-845-1767

www.dream-institute.org


near Montgomery Village
(Posted 09/09/2014)
Santa Rosa

Consultation on Clients' Dreams
Presented by: Meredith Sabini
November 22, 2014 - 10am-1pm
CE Credit: 3 hours
Fee: $75.00

SANTA ROSA DREAM SEMINARS

for psychotherapists

CONSULTATION ON CLIENTS’ DREAMS

Saturday Nov 22 10am-1pm $75 3 CEs

This seminar provides the unique opportunity for clinicians to present clients’ dreams and/or their own dreams about the treatment for exploration and discussion. We will use the instructor’s copyrighted “Anatomy of a Dream” protocol to look at the basic components of a dream: general theme, resources available, dynamic tension or conflict, stance of the dreamer, dream figures, narrative action. This is not a case conference where a client’s history is given, but a dream conference in which you will discover, with the instructor’s guidance, how much a single dream can reveal about psychodynamics. Each participant will have time to present a dream, but it isn’t necessary to bring one in order to benefit.

Learning goals

Those attending will learn to:

1. describe the basic components of any given dream

2. utilize these components in formulating a richer psychodynamic picture of their clients

3. determine which aspects of a dream can fruitfully be discussed with a client.

Instructor: Meredith Sabini, PhD, is director of The Dream Institute and a licensed psychologist (PU7397) in the field since 1972 who now specializes in dream training, research, and consultation.

Registration: To reserve a place, call 510-845-1767 or email dreaminstituteca@gmail.com

and give your name, license, and course choices. You may pay at the door.

Location: Instructor’s home-office near Montgomery Village; map sent upon registration.

THE DREAM INSTITUTE OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA

1672 University Ave. Berkeley, CA 94703 510-845-1767

www.dream-institute.org


near Montgomery Village
(Posted 09/09/2014)