ADA Compliance

In accordance with California Code of Regulations, Title 6, Division 18, Article 8, Section 1887.4.3 Continuing Education Providers are responsible for meeting all applicable local, state and federal standards, including the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), 42 U.S.C. §§ 12101-12213 (2008).

This means CE Providers are responsible for ensuring that attendees with special needs receive reasonable accommodations when a request for reasonable accommodations is made. Therefore, all CE Providers must have a policy for handling ADA-related requests and any materials intended to promote and advertise CE courses should contain information about how participants may request reasonable accommodations to address their special needs issues.

The following is an example of language which may be used on promotional materials:

"Facilities and programs are accessible to persons with disabilities. If you have a special need and plan to attend the workshop, please contact (insert the name of the Program Administrator) at (insert contact information). Please allow as much advance notice as is possible to ensure we have ample opportunity to meet your needs."

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Developing a Program Goals Statement

Program goals are general statements of what the program intends to accomplish. Program goals are broad statements of the kinds of learning you hope participants will achieve—they describe learning outcomes and concepts in general terms. Program goals are statements of long range intended outcomes of the program and should be consistent with the program’s mission. Goals should be relevant to the educational needs and interests of the intended audience.

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Writing Measurable Learning Objectives

Learning objectives are statements that clearly describe what the learner will know or be able to do as a result of having attended an educational program or activity.

Learning objectives must be measurable.

Learning objectives should focus on the learner and contain action verbs that describe measurable behaviors. Learning objectives also benefit learners by helping them clarify their personal goals for a course and give them a framework against which to measure their own success.

A Learning Objective in 4 Steps
Step 1. BEHAVIOR: Describes what participants will be able to do as a consequence of taking a course (e.g., new information,
            skills, knowledge, behavior or attitude). Behavior must be measurable—see list of measurable verbs below.

Step 2. CONDITION: Describes conditions under which the participant will perform the behavior.

Step 3. CRITERIA: Describes the criteria you will use to evaluate the participants performance.

Step 4. COMBINE the behavior, condition, and criteria and you have a learning objective!

Tips for creating learning objectives

  • Keep learning objectives simple.
  • Start each learning objective with a single measurable action verb.
  • Do not use verbs that are vague or verbs that are not measurable.
  • Create interest in using a variety of verbs.

Words to consider when writing learning objectives
Below are some suggested measurable verbs to use when writing learning objectives:

  • Analyze
  • Design
  • Prepare
  • Apply
  • Develop
  • Rate
  • Assess
  • Discuss
  • Recite
  • Compare
  • Explain
  • Revise
  • Compile
  • Give example(s)
  • Select
  • Compute
  • Identify
  • Summarize
  • Create
  • Interpret
  • Tell
  • Critique
  • List
  • Use
  • Demonstrate
  • Plan
  • Utilize
  • Describe
  • Predict
  • Write

Words to avoid when writing learning objectives
(These verbs and phrases are not measurable and should never be used.)

  • Appreciate
  • Familiarize
  • Learn
  • Be acquainted with
  • Grasp the significance of
  • Perceive
  • Be familiar with
  • Grow
  • Realize
  • Become
  • Have an awareness of
  • Really know
  • Belive
  • Have faith in improve
  • Remember
  • Comprehend
  • Increase
  • Study
  • Cover
  • Increase Interest
  • Sympathize with
  • Enjoy
  • Internalize
  • Think critically
  • Expand
  • Know
  • Understand

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Determining Course Credit for Distance Learning Coursework

For programs where instructional time is difficult to calculate, providers must have a method for determining the number of credits to offer and a rationale for this method. CAMFT suggests using one of the following methods for determining course credit:
  1. Pilot test of the representative completion time 
    A sample group of intended professional participants is selected to test program materials in an environment and manner similar to that in which the program is to be presented. CE credit must be recommended based on the representative completion time for the sample. Completion time includes the time spend taking the post-test and does not include the time spent completing the course evaluation.
  2. Computation using a word count formula
    Based on the U.S. Department of Education standards for adult learners, 240 words per minute is the average rate of reading for most college level adults. Depending on factors such as font size, learning environment and the level of technical complexity of the content, the reading rate for adult learners may vary from 120-250 words per minute. Therefore, a provider may reasonably decide to require any self-study reading material to consist of at least 9,250 words for one (1) hour of continuing education credit. This type of CE credit requires a post-test.

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Compiling a Post-test

The following guidelines were developed to assist providers in preparing and creating post-test that accurately assess participant learning.

How to write a test question:

Do
 
Don't
  • Match a test item to a specific learning objective, or an important idea in the course content.
 
  • Ask question that do not assess a learning objective or important point in the course content.
  • Write each question clearly and understandably for the target audience.
 
  • Focus on trivial issues that promote the shallow memorization of facts or details.
  • Write succinct questions.
 
  • Make test items intentionally difficult or tricky.
  • Include a variety of test question formats (e.g., T/F, multiple choice, essay). Be sure that each test question has one undisputedly correct answer
 
  • Use questions provided by a publisher’s test bank without reviewing each item for its relevance to course-specific learning objectives
  • Write test questions at a level of difficulty matching the level of the course learning objectives.
 
  • Include more test items than can be answered by the average participant in the designated amount of time.
  • Have a consistent number of response options.
 
  • Use the responses “all of the above ” or “none of the above. ”
  • Create test questions that require participants to have completed the course.
   

Tips to improve the overall quality of test assessments:

  • Prepare more test questions than you need; review and delete ineffective questions before giving the test
  • Review all test questions once they are compiled to ensure the wording of one question does not give away the answers to another question
  • Field test questions to identify points of confusion or grammatical errors
  • Avoid negatively worded items (e.g., Convicted sex offenders should not be registered in the community in which they live. T/F)
  • Avoid biased questions (e.g., those that subtly or not so subtly, encourage one response over another)

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Creating a Refund/Cancellation Policy

Your refund/cancellation policy must acknowledge cases of non-attendance by a registrant, and should also include:

  • How a request for a refund/cancellation should be submitted (e.g., in writing, email, by phone).
  • Your policy should clearly state how many days a registrant must notify you in advance in order to obtain a refund or cancel, and whether an administrative fee will be assessed.
  • Specify the type of refunds you will provide (i.e., full refund, partial refund, no refund).
  • Indicate the timeframe for issuing of refunds (e.g., 3-5 business days).

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Writing a Grievance Policy

CAMFT-approved providers must have written policies and procedures for complaint and grievance management. Be sure your grievance policy acknowledges the following:

  • Refund requests
  • Complaints about course content
  • Complaints about facilities
  • Complaints about non-receipt of certificates
  • Complaints about miscellaneous occurrences

Grievance policy usually applies to complaints or disputes occurring between a CE participant and CE provider.

Providers must response to all complaints received by the provider, the BBS, or CAMFT in a timely and ethical manner.

A record of each complaint and the resolution must be kept and reported to CAMFT in the initial and subsequent renewal applications.

A grievance statement must be included in promotional materials: “If you have questions or to report grievances please contact _____________.”

For a sample grievance policy and procedures, please review CAMFT’s at www.camft.org/grievance.

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