Attorney Articles | Michael Griffin, JD, Staff Attorney | Page 2
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Articles by Legal Department Staff

The Legal Department articles are not intended to serve as legal advice and are offered for educational purposes only. The information provided should not be used as a substitute for independent legal advice and it is not intended to address every situation that could potentially arise. Please be aware that laws, regulations and technical standards change over time. As a result, it is important to verify and update any reference or information that is provided in the article.

 

The article discusses the topic of starting a private practice. It is intended as a sequel to Part One of “Starting a Private Practice,” which was published in the November/December issue of The Therapist. Issues covered in Part Two includes: Initial inquiries and requests for service, intake procedures, record-keeping and documentation, fees and insurance related issues, and key issues when advertising a practice.

This article discusses starting a private practice. It stresses the importance of planning and identifies key considerations before opening a practice. Practical needs are discussed, legal considerations are identified, and multiple resources are provided to assist in getting started.

When Treating Minors 12 years of age or older, consent does not automatically equal authorization to release confidential medical information

This article discusses the topic of responding to requests for confidential information regarding patients in relation risk-adjustment audits by insurance carriers.

Understanding the Role of the CAMFT Ethics Committee An Interview with CAMFT Ethics Committee Chair, Irving Zaroff, JD, LMFT

This article discusses the general topic of providers utilizing Skype as the source of videoconferencing technology. It explains why Skype is not considered
to be compatible with the requirements of HIPAA and recommends the use of HIPAA compliant alternatives to Skype.

The subset of ICD-10 codes, which concern mental health disorders, are used in billing procedures to indicate the mental health diagnosis of a patient.

This article examines a number of legal and ethical issues, problems, and concerns that therapists often encounter when working with clients who are involved
with the courts.

This article examines a number of key legal and ethical issues which are a part of everyday clinical practice and discusses the importance of developing good practice habits in order to avoid disciplinary actions, lawsuits, and ethics complaints.

In the January/February 2014 issue of The Therapist, members were invited to analyze two clinical vignettes and provide a written response to several questions posed concerning the application of legal and ethical standards to each scenario. Read the responses submitted by Kathleen Wexler, LMFT and Joanne Silva, LMFT.